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Cavaliers guard J.R. Smith defined his considering on the unusual ultimate play of regulation in Game 1 of the NBA Finals, whereas different gamers and coaches detailed what they noticed.
USA TODAY Sports

In the ultimate seconds of time beyond regulation of the wild Game 1 of the NBA Finals between Golden State and Cleveland on Thursday evening, tempers flared, and that might probably have an effect on Sunday’s Game 2. 

With the Warriors main 122-114 and simply three seconds remaining, Shaun Livingston took a soar shot because the shot clock expired, which Cavs massive man Tristan Thompson felt was pointless. Thompson fouled Livingston and appeared to hit him within the head, according to referee Tony Brothers, leading to a flagrant-2 foul and an ejection.

Before leaving the courtroom upon his ejection, Thompson received into an altercation with Warriors ahead Draymond Green, hitting him within the face with each his fist and the ball, and a skirmish ensued. Thompson then appeared to shout at Green to satisfy him within the again.

“I contested a shot that shouldn’t have been taken,” Thompson mentioned after the sport. “I mean, it’s like the unspoken rule in the NBA: If you’re up by 10 or 11 with about 20 seconds left, you don’t take that shot.”

Now comes the league’s overview course of, the place it will be determined if Thompson — or Cavs ahead Kevin Love, who wasn’t within the sport on the time of the skirmish however walked a couple of steps onto the courtroom — will obtain any sort of punishment. 

Per league guidelines, “any player who throws a punch, whether it connects or not, has committed an unsportsmanlike act” and can be suspended for a minimal of 1 sport. 

Rules additionally state that “during an altercation, all players not participating in the game must remain in the immediate vicinity of their bench. Violators will be subject to suspension, without pay, for a minimum of one game and fined up to $50,000.”

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