Kabul, Netanyahu, North Korea: Your Tuesday Briefing

For its half, China says it’s going to refuse to debate Mr. Trump’s two toughest trade demands when U.S. officers arrive in Beijing this week. Washington could must determine whether or not to escalate the dispute — or again down. Above, a port in Shanghai.

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Jawad Jalali/EPA, through Shutterstock

In Kabul, Afghanistan, twin bombings killed at least 25 people, together with 9 journalists. It was the deadliest single assault involving journalists within the nation since not less than 2002.

A 10th journalist, from the BBC’s Afghan service, was shot and killed in a separate assault on Monday outdoors Kabul. Shah Marai was well-known to our reporting crew, and one in all our senior correspondents remembers him and his work. Above, Mr. Marai’s funeral.

A department of the Islamic State claimed accountability.

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Jim Hollander/EPA, through Shutterstock

Israel’s prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, revealed an enormous archive of stolen Iranian nuclear plans that dated again greater than a decade, and accused Iran of lying about its nuclear aspirations.

The transfer strengthened President Trump’s case for pulling out of the 2015 nuclear deal.

And suspicion fell on Israel for strikes on Sunday on two military bases in Syria used by Iran and its proxy militias.

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Tom Brenner/The New York Times

A Trump Nobel?

President Trump acquired an endorsement from President Moon Jae-in of South Korea, a rustic that just some months in the past was fearful that Mr. Trump was bringing battle.

There had been skeptics throughout the political spectrum. “The globalist elite would never give him that win,” Donald Trump Jr. tweeted on Friday after an analogous suggestion emerged. Above, Mr. Trump met with Nigeria’s president, Muhammadu Buhari, on Monday.

The president stated he’d choose to fulfill Kim Jong-un, the North Korean ruler, within the Demilitarized Zone — between the North and South — however White House officers have been discussing sites as far-flung as Singapore and Mongolia.

Separately, attorneys for the grownup movie star Stephanie Clifford, identified professionally as Stormy Daniels, filed a defamation lawsuit against Mr. Trump primarily based on statements he made on Twitter two weeks in the past that questioned her credibility.

Business

• Australia’s prime wealth administration agency, AMP, plunged into additional turmoil after its chairwoman, Catherine Brenner, resigned over revelations that the corporate overcharged its clients and misled regulators. Shares within the 170-year-old firm have fallen about 25 p.c in current weeks, wiping out practically $three billion in market worth.

• A California restaurant chain has set off outrage over its name: Yellow Fever. Its Asian-American founders stated, “We choose to embrace the term and reinterpret it positively for ourselves.”

• U.S. shares were weak. Here’s a snapshot of global markets. Hong Kong, Shanghai and the National Stock Exchange of India will likely be closed on May 1.

In the News

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Meghan Dhaliwal for The New York Times

• After a monthlong journey by way of Mexico, a caravan of Central American migrants was instructed on the U.S. border that immigration officers couldn’t course of their claims. President Trump has known as the group a nationwide safety risk. [The New York Times]

• The Gonski 2.zero report: Australia’s faculties have “failed a generation” of youngsters and the nation must overhaul its industrial-era mannequin of training, in keeping with a overview led by the businessman David Gonski. [The Guardian]

President Emmanuel Macron of France can have dinner in Sydney with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, on a go to meant to cement protection ties. In 2016, France gained a $38 billion contract to produce submarines to Australia. [Reuters]

When is a coronary heart not price fixing? With extra Americans growing coronary heart infections from injecting medicine, U.S. medical doctors are dealing with the ethically fraught query of whether or not pricey surgical procedure is nicely spent on drug customers whose dependancy goes untreated. [The New York Times]

• “Look, the web belongs to the Americans — however blockchain will belong to us.” That’s how one technologist remembers the reason a Russian spy gave final 12 months for the Kremlin’s curiosity within the know-how and requirements for digital currencies. [The New York Times]

• In Japan, a fugitive, jail-breaking thief was arrested after a 23-day manhunt that concerned 1000’s of law enforcement officials and captivated the nation. [The Asahi Shimbun]

• A primary-for-Australia initiative to investigate celebration medicine discovered odd components in a few of these circulating on the Grooving the Moo music competition, together with toothpaste, spray paint and a muscle rub. More troubling was the invention of N-ethylpentylone, or ephylone, which is accountable mass overdoses world wide. [ABC]

Smarter Living

Tips, each new and outdated, for a extra fulfilling life.

• If you noticed the “Four Corners” episode on sugar and politics, you may wish to overview our information on how to avoid eating sugar.

• Your mind can trick you into trusting folks, simply because they sound like they know what they’re talking about.

• Recipe of the day: The best chicken salad isn’t concerning the seasonings, it’s the feel.

Noteworthy

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• The summer season of ’78: Six months in the past, two deserted containers had been discovered with 1000’s of images taken in parks throughout New York City. Here’s a selection of those images, unseen for 40 years.

And two Opinion items of notice: A comedian defends Michelle Wolf’s controversial routine on the annual dinner of the White House Correspondents’ Association.

And a former C.I.A. director, Michael Hayden, sharply criticizes President Trump’s method to intelligence and ponders the way forward for C.I.A. officers. “We traditionally rely on their truth-telling to protect us from our enemies,” Mr. Hayden writes. “Now we need it to save us from ourselves.”

Back Story

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NASA

It doesn’t usually occur that what you obtain on the age of 11 makes an enduring affect.

But on this day in 1930, “Pluto” was steered because the identify of what was then the newly found ninth planet, impressed by a British schoolgirl, Venetia Burney.

Shortly after “Planet X” was found in February of that 12 months, Venetia’s grandfather was studying concerning the information over breakfast. Interested in mythology, Venetia steered Pluto, the Roman god of the underworld.

Her grandfather, a retired librarian at Oxford, despatched her suggestion to a professor of astronomy on the college, who wrote again: “I think PLUTO excellent!!”

The identify labored on a couple of ranges: As probably the most distant planet, the identify of an underworld god befitted it properly. And the planet’s first two letters matched the initials of Percival Lowell, the astronomer who initiated the search that led to Pluto.

As a reward, her grandfather gave her a five-pound notice, and later an asteroid was named 6235 Burney in her honor, in 1987.

But she was modest about her achievement during an interview with NASA in 2006 (the identical 12 months that Pluto was demoted to a dwarf planet): “It doesn’t arise in conversation and you don’t just go around telling people that you named Pluto.”

Anna Schaverien wrote at present’s Back Story.

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