Report: Tyus Battle Will Return to Syracuse After Declaring for 2018 NBA Draft | Bleacher Report

Report: Tyus Battle Will Return to Syracuse After Declaring for 2018 NBA Draft | Bleacher Report

DETROIT, MI - MARCH 16:  Tyus Battle #25 of the Syracuse Orange reacts during the second half against the TCU Horned Frogs in the first round of the 2018 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament at Little Caesars Arena on March 16, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan.  (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)

Gregory Shamus/Getty Images

Tyus Battle has reportedly withdrawn from the 2018 NBA draft and can return to Syracuse for his junior season, in accordance to ESPN.com’s Jeff Goodman

Battle declared for the draft in April, however he opted not to rent an agent. As a consequence, he was ready to hold his choices open and get a really feel for his draft inventory earlier than making a last name upfront of Wednesday’s early-entry withdrawal deadline. 

Battle averaged 19.2 factors on 39.9 % taking pictures from the sphere as a sophomore, and he helped the Orange make a run to the Midwest Regional semifinal behind three double-digit outings within the NCAA event, together with a 15-point effort within the First Four in opposition to Arizona State and 17-point efficiency within the second spherical versus Michigan State. 

Battle additionally got here up huge with 19 factors in a Sweet 16 loss to Duke. 

The 6’6” swingman proceeded to make the journey to Chicago earlier this month for the NBA draft mix, and he tested well athletically with the second-fastest shuttle run (2.87 seconds) and fourth-fastest three-quarter-court dash (three.07 seconds) amongst all individuals. 

But as ESPN.com’s Mike Schmitz famous, Battle “struggled to discover his manner in five-on-five play” and “was unable to add worth when taking part in off the ball, which he’ll seemingly be requested to do within the NBA.”

Back at Syracuse, Battle ought to look to enhance his effectivity as a mid-range marksman—he made 38.9 % of his two-point jumpers final season, per Hoop-Math.com—and three-point shooter (32.2 %) in hopes of cementing himself as a dependable, NBA-caliber quantity scorer. 

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