See the Full Flower Moon of May 2018 in a Slooh Webcast Tonight!

See the Full Flower Moon of May 2018 in a Slooh Webcast Tonight!

May’s full moon will shine brilliant tonight, but when cloudy skies damage your view, do not fret; you possibly can watch the lunar sight dwell on-line.

The full moon of May 2018 is called the Full Flower Moon. It will star in a live webcast on Slooh.com tonight (May 29), starting at 7 p.m. EDT (2300 GMT).

You may watch the full-moon webcast on Space.com, courtesy of the Slooh on-line observatory. The webcast will characteristic dwell views of the moon rising over the Andes mountains of South America from Slooh’s observatory in Chile. The webcast will even characteristic views of the full moon from Slooh’s flagship observatory at the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands, in Spain. [May 2018 Full Moon: Here’s What to Expect]

The full moon of may 2018 rises on May 29. Here, a view the full moon of April, 30, 2018 as seen by an astronaut on the International Space Station.

The full moon of might 2018 rises on May 29. Here, a view the full moon of April, 30, 2018 as seen by an astronaut on the International Space Station.

Credit: NASA

May’s full moon truly peaked earlier right this moment, at 10:20 a.m. EDT (1420 GMT), however the moon can nonetheless seem full to informal observers at the least sooner or later forward of and after the precise occasion.

Observers even have a probability to see the brilliant planet Venus, which shines brightly in the western sky as the moon rises in the east. Jupiter can be seen in the constellation Libra this night.

During tonight’s webcast, Slooh’s Paul Cox might be “going back-to-basics to explain how our moon formed, what causes lunar phases, as well as an unusual phenomenon where the moon appears to ‘rock and roll’!” Slooh representatives mentioned in a assertion.

Slooh’s Helen Avery will even clarify precisely why May’s full moon is greatest often called the Full Flower Moon. She’ll additionally focus on other names for the moon and their historical past, in keeping with a present description.

During the webcast, Slooh will even kick off its “How Many Moons in One Night?” problem, to see how moons of photo voltaic system planets customers can spot utilizing the firm’s robotic telescopes in a single night time. 

Editor’s be aware:If you snap a tremendous photograph of May’s full moon tonight and wish to share it with Space.com for a story or photograph gallery, ship feedback and pictures to [email protected]

Email Tariq Malik at [email protected] or comply with him @tariqjmalik. Follow us @Spacedotcom, Facebook and Google+. Original article on Space.com.



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